Trends in VET over the next 1 – 5 years – Are you ready?

hybrid

An Horizon Report [http://tinyurl.com/pgcurox], compiled by a global consortium of *educators and *business people identifies the trends in emerging technologies that may impact on education and training policies, practices and approaches in the coming 1-5 years

Education and training paradigms are shifting to include more online learning, blended and hybrid learning, and collaborative models.

Personalising learning experiences where learners are taking control of their learning, not relying upon institutions or companies for providing education and/or vocational development they want and need, is just beginning—in 2014 the movement will continue.

If ever there was a time, and there always has been, to address the lack of VET Educationists’ direct input in the so-called Industry-led VET System, it is now.

The VET industry is where adult learning and the workplace are intended to collaborate, focusing on the transition from education and training to employment.

In this way, VET is intended to support the Economy, transitioning students from learning to working, identifying the needs of the workplace and ensuring those needs are met.

The latest Horizon Report [http://tinyurl.com/pgcurox], compiled by a global consortium of *educators and *business people identifies the trends in emerging technologies that may impact on education and training policies, practices and approaches in the coming 1-5 years.

The trends reflect factors that will affect technology planning and decision making in an Economy. The trends identified have business policy implications, but two are expected to have stronger implications over the next few years.

1. Learning and assessment that is supported with digital and interactive resources.
2. Approaches to delivery and instruction that are flexible, responsive and adaptive to new ideas.

The term “hybrid course” (a term used interchangeably with the term “blended learning”) names a model of course design that combines traditional, face-to-face class time with online and out-of-class course work. Hybrid education and training models, designed and implemented successfully enable students to travel to a campus or a workplace for some activities, while using the World Wide Web for others.

There is a need to identify the needs of VET practitioners and changing student/workforce requirements. Some technological developments may impact directly upon the business of teaching/training and learning. These sorts of developments, if they occur at anything like the rate predicted, will place significant pressure on the VET workforce to upgrade their own IT and related skills.

Sooner rather than later, Public and Private RTOs [Not-for-Profit and For-Profit] will need to determine identify the needs of VET practitioners and the changing student/workforce requirements [no matter what the out-dated Training Packages may say] together with the correct blend of:

1. infrastructure change

2. VET professional learning

3. VET Practitioner up-skilling; and

4. risk-taking.

In a so-called “Industry-led VET System” in Australia, managing these new hybrid learning trends effectively will heavily rely on obtaining the right information and support from experts in the VET education and training ‘industry’ and technology sectors.

Sources for social trends affecting education 

1) Collaborating seamlessly whether at a distance or face-to-face, without technological barriers to get in the way is becoming a reality for professionals, Trainees and VET Educationists, and will be integral to the education and training experience.

2) Humanising interactions in online learning, meetings, presentations and classroom learning is an unmet need, soon to be addressed by the many new and improved synchronous and asynchronous tools. The lack of a ‘human touch’ has long been a criticism of online learning, but now as tools get better and the cost barrier falls, the ability to connect face-to-face virtually is becoming a reality in education, and will only expand over time as the comfort levels with the technology increases among VET Educationists.

3) Personalising learning experiences where learners are taking control of their learning, not relying upon institutions or companies for providing education and/or vocational development they want and need, is just beginning—in 2014 the movement will continue.

Will social media influence education by increasing collaboration, humanize the learning experience, and support personalized learning in 2014? Time will tell.

If ever there was a time, and there always has been, to address the lack of VET Educationists direct input in the so-called Industry-led VET System it is now.

 

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